DJ PPC Tip: Types Of Keywords To Target In Google Ads

August 1, 2019 by Matthew Campbell

Before discussing keywords, let’s start with the basics. You will first want to create a Google Ads account. To create or login to your Google Ads account, go to the URL – ads.google.com. You will need to add a credit card number to create your account. I do not recommend a Google Ads Express account as you do not have access to all features.

What does PPC stand for? PPC is short for Pay-Per-Click. This means that for each click on your ad, you will have to pay X amount of money. Whether the cost per click is $0.52 per click or $4.56 per click. However, the amount you pay per click is not only derived by the amount that you and your competitors are bidding. The amount you actually pay per click is based upon your Ad Rank.

Basically, your Ad Rank = Cost per click bid multiplied by your quality score. Several factors make up your quality score including the relevancy of your keywords to your ads and your landing page, landing page experience, and expected click rate of your ad. The more relevant your ads and landing pages are to the user, the more likely it is that you’ll see higher Quality Scores.

Actual Cost Per Click Table

Advertiser Max Bid Quality Score Ad Rank Actual CPC
DJ I $2.00 10/10 20 $1.61
DJ II $4.00 4/10 16 $3.01
DJ III $6.00 2/10 12 $4.01
DJ IV $8.00 1/10 8 Highest CPC

How can you increase your quality score? Let’s say you are targeting the keyword phrase “Las Vegas Wedding DJ”. The keyword search relevance to a landing page is not your home page as your home page targets all of your services. Rather, you should be sending potential customers from your ad to your website page promoting weddings. In addition, your ad should have a heading, URL, and description with the words “Las Vegas Wedding DJ” incorporated into them. This offers a consistent user experience theme from search to ad click to landing page. Your landing page should include a contact form and phone number. Both the website phone number calls and form submissions should be tracked as a conversion/lead in your Google Ads account (more on conversion tracking in a future article).

Now that you know what makes up the cost of your ads, you need to know the type of keywords to use in your ad targeting. There are 4 types of keyword match types:

· Broad Match
· Modified Broad Match
· Phrase Match
· Exact Match

Broad Match searches include misspellings, synonyms, related searches, and other relevant variations. I do not recommend this match type for any ad campaign as there are too many variables to control in order to be successful.

Modified Broad Match searches include all the terms designated with a + sign (or close variations of those terms) in any order. Additional words may appear before, after, or between the terms.

Phrase Match searches match the phrase (or close variations of the phrase) with additional words before or after.

Exact Match searches exactly match the term or close variations of that exact term with the same meaning.

Google Ads Keyword Match Types Table

Match Type Special Symbol Example Keyword Example Searches
Broad Match none wedding DJ hire a wedding DJ, how to DJ a wedding
Modified Broad Match +keyword +wedding +DJ wedding DJ and musicians, wedding photobooth and DJ
Phrase Match “keyword” “wedding DJ” wedding DJ in Las Vegas, best wedding DJs in Seattle
Exact Match [keyword] [wedding DJ] wedding DJs, DJ weddings

When you consider the keywords you want to target for your Google Ads campaign, it is better to start very specific and work your way to broader searches.  It is much easier to cast a small net than to try and reel back in.  As a result, I would suggest starting with an exact match [las vegas wedding DJ] and phrase match “las vegas wedding DJ” as a start to see the ROI.  Later on, you can target other searches such as +best +Las +Vegas +DJ as you get more familiar with the advertising platform and process.  Note: substitute Las Vegas for your local city.

Now that you know the different types of keywords to target, next I will review the second most important feature of running a Google Ads campaign – negative keywords.

Matthew Campbell Matthew Campbell (18 Posts)

Matthew Campbell is the founder of My Wedding Songs. He DJ’d weddings, parties, and High School dances in Montana during the 90s – and also attended a few Mobile Beat Conferences. Matt continued his love of music through the creation of My Wedding Songs. He and his wife, Sharon, live in the wedding capital of the world, Las Vegas, Nevada. My Wedding Songs is a charter member of the Las Vegas Wedding Chamber of Commerce. Matthew is also an SEO Specialist and PPC Manager at Horizon Web Marketing since 2014.


Filed Under: Mobile DJ Business, Mobile DJ Sales & Marketing