Wedding Marketing Shenanigans? You make the call!!

April 24, 2011 by Andy Ebon

The RulesAs a DJ Entertainer and a wedding marketing strategist, I’ve worked with brides and wedding industry professionals for four decades. In the main, the professionals I’ve done business with, and worked side-by-side with, are competent, ethical, and do the industry proud.

In any line of business, though, one will come across a spectrum of activities that cast a pall over true professionals. This post tells a story about one set of questionable actions that came to my attention, quite by accident. I have taken some time to calmly consider the facts and report them. In the end, I will ask for YOUR opinion.

The Actions

Periodically, as part of routine, wedding industry research, I spot check national, regional, local, and company-specific websites. I’m looking for excellence, trends, foolishness, and any random thing that catches my eye.

In that mode, I was cruising through a number of national websites, when something caught my eye in the local wedding vendors of GetMarried.com.

I did a search for DJs in Las Vegas and found a couple of listings. I didn’t recognize either of the company names, so I thoroughly examined those listings and their websites.

One, in particular, caught my eye, AllStarDJsNow.com. The link to its site took me to a nicely designed, 2-screen WordPress-based site. The welcome page sported a logo-banner, a picture of a steak dinner, a photo of dance floor activity, a small amount of copy, and an inquiry form.

It also includes the statement: Over 3,000 happy brides & grooms recommend All Star DJs!”

There is an offer stating:No purchase necessary – Simply make an appointment, look at our DJ plans and pick up your free steak dinner certificate!”

Finally, it noted: “As seen in Las Vegas Bride Magazine.” and showed a badge from a local wedding networking company, WPLV (Wedding Professionals of Las Vegas).

On the About screen, there was some upbeat sell copy describing why the bride should consider All Star DJs Now.

Red Flags

There were several:

  • The author for the site is shown as: Posted on December 1, 2010 by Boom Marketing
  • Boom Marketing is the company that owns both Las Vegas Bride Magazine and WPLV. It also producers three bridal shows in the Las Vegas Valley: Las Vegas Bridal Expo, Summerlin Bridal Show, and Green Valley Bridal Show.
  • DJ’s are an outgoing bunch, generally. And this site didn’t offer the name or photo any owner or DJ. That seemed odd.
  • The site was very brief. No testimonials on the site. Three text-testimonials were offered on the GetMarried.com listing.
  • When one looks up site ownership of the domain name, using WHOIS, it shows Big Dream Marketing is the owner, and the registration of the domain name was done on December 4, 2010. As a separate item, Big Dream Marketing has changed its name to Boom Marketing. The owner, address, phone, etc.,. are the same.

You might ask…

  • How could a company touting 3000 happy brides and grooms only have created a website four months ago? – Probable answer… In the 21st century it would seem highly unlikely that such a prolific company, with more than 3000 weddings under its belt, is just recently offering a website. Hard to fathom that a business with a website could rack up such a tremendous number of successful bookings.
  • Since the AllStarDJsNow.com site showed a WPLV badge, it should be a member of that organization, shouldn’t it? A quick trip to the WPLV membership directory showed 13 companies listed in Music and Entertainment area. All Star DJs Now was not one of them. In a recent issue of Las Vegas Bride Magazine, All Star DJs Now sported a full-page ad on the right hand side of the publication, at the gateway to the disc jockey entertainment section.
  • Where is All Star DJs Now located? There is no address given on its website; however, on the Get Married lsting, it shows 3320 N. Buffalo Dr. Ste 102 – Las Vegas, NV 89129. That would be the same address as Boom Marketing, Las Vegas Bride Magazine and WPLV.
  • Where is the site hosted? It’s a free, WordPress.com site.

So, what does this likely mean?

  • What is this site, really? It appears to be an ersatz website representing a fictitious company. Online inquiries to the company resulted in no emails or call backs. Phone inquiries were answered by a voice mail box, with a female voice representing the company.
  • Why would this alleged fictitious company take out an ad in a national wedding directory? Often, national organizations will not allow advertising from local wedding marketing companies (publications, shows or directories). They will, from time to time, partner or collaborate on cross-promotions. For example, a national publisher may provide magazines to a local bridal show producer to give out at the show. For that added distribution, the publisher might provide banner ads or email blasts on their website. These arrangements are usually made on a ‘per-show’ basis. It would seem that the listing, in question, was placed to gather leads of local Las Vegas brides for purposes other than the DJ services of All Star DJs.
  • Why would local leads be important? Bridal show producers spend a lot of media dollars to attract traffic to their websites and shows. This was be a relatively inexpensive ‘back door’ method to garner bride information, without having a show listing.

In all cases, I’m for fair, if sometimes fierce, competition. This one made me jump back.

For you, does the scenario described pass the smell test?

SUGGESTION: Visit the original post on The Wedding Marketing Blog and read from comments that have come in from across North America, and all the way to Australia.

FEEDBACK PLEASE: Your comments, opinions, and perspective are highly encouraged. Please take a couple of minutes to evaluate what has been presented and offer your views. As a DJ, specifically, if this were happening to you, in your market, how would you react?

Andy Ebon
The Wedding Marketing Authority

FYI: FULL DISCLOSURE: I co-founded, and assist with, another local networking group, Las Vegas Wedding Network.

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Andy Ebon Andy Ebon (78 Posts)

Keith Alan has been in the DJ biz since 1975, started hosting weddings in 1982 and went full-time in 1993. While personally hosting over 60 weddings a year on the weekends, his mid-week programs generate income through out the year. Young children and seniors are the strong points of the business. Outside of the weddings division of Keith Alan Productions, Keith’s summer program, Campardy™ has grown from 1 event in 2000, to 75 events within a 6 week window! Keith is busy with game shows, trivia, photo booths and extreme bingo the other 46 weeks of the year.


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