Karaoke Host (KJ) Training Framework

KJ Hosting tip from Eric Godfrey

Eric Godfrey manages:
USKaraokeAlliance.com
Karaoke2Night.com network
StarzKaraoke.com
ArizonaKaraokeContest.com

KJ Host Training Plan:
If you are a KJ or karaoke hosting company and you are training someone, we follow a process so that when that host takes over a show they are not overwhelmed.  It is not rocket science and sharing it with others seems like a good thing to do.

Before starting this program a prospective host should see an entire show from beginning to end and be sure they can handle this for a 4 to 5 hour period.  If they do not have the stamina to stay in the audience beginning to end, they will never be able to handle 3 or 4 nights a week of shows with set-ups and tear-downs.

1st night - Trainee host stays with trainer-host entire night and observes everything, learning how to adjust volumes and sound and operating the program.

Outside the clubs – This is a private training session with manager or owner to go over equipment knowledge, sound theory,  terminology and KJ program use.

2nd night – Trainee will run the gear and the program for entire night and occasionally chime in on microphones as appropriate.  Trainer should help as needed, but by end of the evening the trainee should be comfortable.
3rd night - Let trainer-host run gear, but trainee interfaces with customers and runs the microphones back and forth and makes announcements all night.  Always make sure to announce bar specials & acknowledge the service staff numerous times, in addition to changing up how you introduce and acknowledge the singers.  This is the hardest night on most trainees.

Some prospective hosts will need to repeat the gear and program running night or the microphone night to get comfortable before attempting to pass certification test.

Final Test - Run complete show effectively including set-up and proper operation of gear without your trainer-host having to take over at any time.

These are the basics.  Learning to run your KJ Program and your gear and understanding terminology are entirely other lessons.  Either way, let your actual personality come out and have fun. If you get past your worries and get going and understand all aspects then you need to be having a good time when you are hosting.  If you are not having a good time, then you might want to re-evaluate if you should host shows.   No matter what, have a good time, but remember to try to keep some level of professionalism!

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